Search

Emma James Physio Blog

Chartered Physiotherapy and Clinical Pilates

Tag

health

Benefits of working with a Personal Trainer

There are many reasons why having a Personal Trainer (PT) can benefit you, people of all ages and abilities. See better results by living a happier more active lifestyle.

A Personal Trainer will help build a unique training plan for each individual, which can easily be adapted and adjusted. Exercises can be regressed or progressed depending on the level of fitness, injury, results driven, time and if having an ‘off day’.

Top 5 Benefits

1. Faster and Better results

person-training-1Having a Personal Trainer will make sure you stick to your programme and push you to your limits during a workout session. Often when you work out solo you can become distracted and don’t push yourself as much. Time is always an excuse as not to work out but having a PT can adjust programs so they are just as affective no matter what the length of time you have available.
By pushing your boundaries, you will see faster results, this could be weight loss, toning up, cardio/fitness level or strength.

2. Fat loss and Muscle Gain
This is not everyone’s main goal but for 80% off people hitting the gym it is. Having a Personal Trainer, they know the right exercise each individual should be doing to achieve their goals. A mixture of weight training to gain muscles and become stronger and cardio to get fitter and leaner

3. Reduce chance of injury
A Personal Trainer will teach proper form and technique, which will prevent injury. Injuries can easily occur from not warming up properly or doing exercises incorrectly.

4. Establish a lifestyle habit and routine
A Personal Trainer can help motivate and encourage to create new habits. Once a routine is established it is easier to stick to, making it part of your lifestyle will make it easier to achieve results. Exercise and diet are all about consistency if you want to see those results.

5. They fit into your schedule
We all have busy lives and lots going on the beauty of a Personal Trainer is that they will adapt their time to fit in with you. So if you need an early morning or late evening workout a PT will be there.

person-training-outside6. Flexibility on Location
Many do not like working out in a gym as it can be crowded and over whelming. A Personal Trainer can change the location of any workout from either the gym, a home work out or even outside.

7. They can help with specific goals – an Event
As well helping set realistic goals a Personal Trainer can help set a training plan and train for specific event whether this be a run, triathlon, swim or a sporting event etc. With events you need to reach a certain level of fitness to be able to compete and stay injury free.

8. Mentor / Mental Health
Exercise realises endorphins which are ‘happy hormones’ they can help make you feel good physically and mentally. A Personal Trainer can help motivate you when you are suffering from mental health issues, they can help keep you on course to release the greatest number of endorphins. This in turn helps with a person’s overall wellbeing. A PT cares about how stressed you are, they will listen to you, they want to give you the best results which can be impacted on how you are feeling.

If this sounds interesting and you need that extra push why not call or email Emma James Physio to find out more….
reception@ejphysio.co.uk
01442 870686pippa

Pippa
x

Blog Post by Pippa
FCO Gym Manager & Personal Trainer
Emma James Physio

 

Advertisements

Work related stress & how to manage it

Up to half a million people in the UK experience work-related stress every year, which often results in illness (Health and Safety Executive 2011).

The signs of stress can vary from one individual to the next (NHS Choices 2011). They may manifest physically as an illness, tiredness or lethargy or as symptoms such as sore, tight muscles or erratic sleep patterns. Mental stress can result in depression, mood swings, anger, frustration, confusion, paranoid behaviour, jealousy or withdrawal.
Treatments include medication such as anti-anxiety drugs, cognitive behavioural therapy, relaxation techniques (NHS Choices 2011), acupuncture and floatation therapy.

How acupuncture can help

Stress is a common complaint cited by acupuncture and these individuals present with a variety of symptoms. Can acupuncture help with stress and anxiety? Let’s look at the research…..

One small randomised controlled trial (RCT) suggested that acupuncture might be successful in treating the symptoms of chronic stress (Huang 2011). Another study which looked at healthy individuals subjected to stress testing found acupuncture at an acupuncture point used for stress was more effective than a ‘control’ point (Fassoulaki 2003). A study by Pavao (2011) found acupuncture might be effective in attenuating psychological distress, as well as increasing cellular immunity. acupunctureIn a small pilot study, the use of one particular acupuncture point led to marked reductions in stress (Chan 2002).

Acupuncture is proposed to have many effects, including stimulating the nervous system and causing the release of neurochemical messenger molecules. The resulting biochemical changes influence the body’s homeostatic (state of equilibrium) mechanisms, thus promoting physical and emotional well-being.

Floatation Therapy

In addition to acupuncture, another alternative treatment for stress and anxiety is floatation therapy. During a floatation session you effortlessly float in an Epsom-salt solution. The solution is heated and maintained at skin temperature (37°C) and the environment in the tank is controlled so that the air is also skin temperature.

floatation-therapy
This creates an environment similar to that of the Dead Sea (but nearer to home!) which lets you float effortlessly on the surface of the solution, enjoying a feeling of total  freedom & complete weightlessness!

Preliminary research has shown that floatation therapy may lower stress, anxiety and even depression by reducing how much sensory input the brain and nervous system receive (Feinstein, 2018).

At Emma James we have our own Floatation Tank. Please just call us if you would like any more information on how this, or acupuncture, could help you.

lisa

Lisa
x

Blog post by Lisa
Senior Physiotherapist
MSc MACP MHCPC MCSP 

Emma James Physio

Rheumatoid Arthritis Awareness Week

nras-logoRheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Awareness Week 2019 takes place between June 17th and 23, and is an annual event to raise awareness of the condition. The event is run by the National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society (NRAS).

Physiotherapists are members of the multi-disciplinary team involved in the treatment and management of people with rheumatoid arthritis to help an individual achieve their short and long-term needs.

They work closely with multi-disciplinary team colleagues, such as occupational therapists, podiatrists and orthotists, and will refer you to them when necessary.

When will you see a physiotherapist?

Physiotherapists have a key role throughout the course of the disease. The extent of their involvement will vary throughout that time, dependent upon the individual’s needs.

What physiotherapy can offer an individual with Rheumatoid Arthritis:

After diagnosis they will offer education and advice, which is likely to include information regarding how to recognise and manage a flare, when to rest and when to exercise, and advice on how to modify activities to reduce pain and maintain/ improve function. People with rheumatoid arthritis often find that their joints become stiff and muscles become weak and therefore carrying out normal daily activities, such as getting up and down the stairs or in and out of a chair, can become hard. Physiotherapists can help by teaching mobility and strengthening exercises to increase movement and strength allowing better function.

Why exercise is important

exercise

Exercise is important as part of a healthy lifestyle to maintain fitness, control weight, maintain joint range of movement, improve muscle strength and endurance and improve mental wellbeing maintaining joint range of movement, strengthening muscle and increasing endurance.

A Physiotherapist is a specialist in advising on exercise. It is important to find a safe way of exercising that the individual enjoys and will be able to continue in the future.

Further reading:

anyoneanyage

 

lisa

Lisa
x

Blog post by Lisa
Senior Physiotherapist
MSc MACP MHCPC MCSP 

Emma James Physio

 

 

Stretching – why is it so important?

It’s the one thing we should all do before and after exercise but the one phase everyone tends to skip… I think maybe because it’s boring, we are always pushed for time and it’s not perceived as being that important.

Stretching is so important at the start of a work out, as it gives your muscles the opportunity to warm up and become more elastic, which means you will be able to perform better when you start your main set or workout.

Stretching will help prevent injury as cold muscles are more likely to be torn or strained. It is always best to start your work out with 5 minutes of cardio of your choice then dynamic stretching – stretching while moving as it will help increase blood flow and muscle temperature.

At the end of the workout your muscles will be warm and maybe sore depending on what you have been doing.

pippa-2a

There are many reasons why you should stretch after exercising:

  • It will help maintain elasticity within the muscles, improve strength and keep them healthy. This is so important to keep the flexibility up as it will help in turn with joint movement which will have an impact on your overall performance of working out and everyday life activities.
  • When your muscles are warm and you hold a stretch for longer, 45 seconds it will improve the elasticity of that muscle making you more flexible.
  • Decrease the risk of injury
  • Enable your muscles to work more effectively
  • Help keep a healthy body and mind. Stretching can also be really relaxing and help your mind switch off, decreasing stress.
  • It helps relieve the stress on muscles after a hard work out, your muscles can often get tight and stiff, stretching will slow down the process of aches and pains.
  • It can help improve your posture, stretching your lower back, shoulders and chest will help keep your body in better alignment.
  • Reduces lower back, better flexibility in your hamstrings, hip flexors and other muscles around your pelvis helps relieve stress on the lower lumber. This is especially good for those who have desk jobs.

pippaHappy Stretching!

Pippa
x

Blog Post by Pippa
FCO Gym Manager & Personal Trainer
Emma James Physio

Don’t be scared of eating good fats…..

Good fat is found in foods like:

  • Seeds
  • Avocados
  • Seafood
  • Oils
  • Meat
  • Fish
  • Nuts

Why you ask?

  1. Good fat helps you from overeating because it tells your brain to stop eating
  2. Fat slows the rate at which sugar hits your bloodstream, and this allows your blood sugar levels to remain steady
  3. Most importantly, keeping your hunger and cravings at bay

More information & health advice:

kerry-gym-managerHappy, healthy eating Buddies!
Kerry
x

Kerry
Personal Trainer & Group Gym Manager

Ralf – My Apos Story

I have been an amateur runner throughout my life. However I hadn’t actually participated in races up to about 5 years ago. Approaching my 70th birthday also saw me running 10 km and even a semi-marathon in 2017.

In November 2017, training for my first dash of a full marathon I experienced terrible pain on my left knee. It did not come about suddenly but gradually grew over a few days. I stopped running since I was unable to make even a few hundred meters without feeling atrocious stabbings on my lower leg. Even walking became horribly difficult.
Not only my running life seems to have ended but daily chores involving my legs would preoccupy my thoughts for years to come.

The conclusion was evident: left knee arthritis. ‘’You have to alter your whole lifestyle. If you feel that this state affects only a quarter of your daily activity you are not ready for knee surgery. However a few more years of lowered energy and you definitely need one’’.

I was against surgery as I had heard of many cases of unsuccessful results. In May 2018, my sister, who is also a runner but definitely better than me, advised me to look into AposTherapy. She had witnessed the positive results in many of her friends who came back to run after years of forced inactivity.

The therapy started in May and went throughout the summer months, growing from 30 to 60 minutes a day. Some days when I did not find time to walk, I just put the computer on a high table and wrote standing.

In October my first baby runs took place: Only half kilometer or so. I was rejoiced by the fact that the pounding reduced although it came back after some distance. I continued every day with the therapy, even going out to the supermarket with my Apos shoes.
In November my weekly runs were up to 6 km although excruciatingly slow, taking me 1 hour when during that period previously I would have run a full 10 km.
My clearest objective for a nice start to the New Year was a Parkrun. These 5 km courses on Saturdays in parks all around Britain are great introductions for people of any age, who want to change their lifestyles by short runs.
I consistently delayed my first parkrun since even the slowest runner will finish in 45 minutes (9 minutes/km) and I was not sure the volunteers will wait for me, at about 50 – 55 minutes.

Therefore I was astounded when my first Parkrun was completed in 35 minutes. The 400 participants had probably created a magnetic field that just carried me to the end.
This was the most worthwhile gift for the New Year. I could run, respectfully. Of course there still was slight pain afterwards but the progress was evident.

It was nothing short of miraculous for me. I have to admit that Apos was not alone in this marvel. The open sea swims in summer and weekly strength exercises in my local gym were evidently helpful in reinforcing body and legs.

However first award goes to Apos. I am thoroughly happy and naturally reflect it on family and friends.

Blog post by Ralf
Apos Therapy customer

20170525-img_0583

Post Pregnancy exercise

Hi,

Being a mum I know the importance of exercise after having kids so heres my Top Tips on why Post Pregnancy exercise is so important to your wellbeing.

Regular exercise after pregnancy can:

  • Promote Weight loss, especially when combined with reduced calorie intake
  • Improve your cardiovascular fitness
  • Strengthen and tone abdominal muscles
  • Help enhance your mood
  • Improve flexibility
  • Reduce the heavy postnatal depression with a healthy mind

 

Why not try our Post Pregnancy exercise classes at Emma James Physio:

  • Bespoke luxury personal training and physio studio
  • Specialist care for hypermobility, bladder issues, complicated biomechanics
  • Fitness studio for every women and people wanting to get back into exercise, we are almost the luxury stepping stone back to the gym
  • Rehab gym
  • You are not just a number in a class, our studio has a more personal feel
  • Exercise in a friendly and fun environment
  • Small group classes

Further Information:

Post by Emma James – October 2018

Press Ups – the benefits

What are the benefits of press ups…..

Press ups are not only great for your chest, but they do a tremendous job of defining your abs, triceps, shoulders and torso.

  • Press ups build strength – across the whole body
  • Press ups boost metabolism
  • Improve your posture
  • Prevent lower back injuries by strengthening your torso

Learn more about Personal Training at www.ejphysio.co.uk

Tips for running

Here are my 9 essential top tips you will need to get up and running!

Is my:

  1. Face and jaw relaxed
  2. Head upright, slight lean looking forwards to a point 20-40 metres away
  3. Shoulders in a relaxed and comfortable position
  4. Natural curves of the spine
  5. Arms move in a pendulum – like movement close into the side of the body, with the movement coming from the shoulder joint
  6. Elbows bent at 90 degrees
  7. Fingers and thumbs relaxed
  8. Hips and shoulders facing forwards, with a minimum rotation
  9. Focus on keeping core strong

 

Happy Running!
Kerry
Personal Trainer & Gym Manager at Emma James Physio

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: