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Emma James Physio Blog

Chartered Physiotherapy and Clinical Pilates

Growing Pains

Growing pains (Traction Apophysitis) can occur in children following a period of rapid growth and/ or increase in sporting activity. During periods of rapid skeletal growth (think teenagers suddenly almost growing overnight) the cartilage within long bones of the body is weaker and becomes more susceptible to injury.

Growing pains most commonly affect tendon attachments at these sites: the heel (Sever’s disease), below the knee cap (Osgood-Schlatter’s) and at the base of the knee cap (Sindig-Larsen-Johansson). Often these children participate in running and jumping sports (but not always).

Onset is usually gradual with pain over the areas mentioned above. Unfortunately, often growing pains mean the child ends up resting from their sport. However, rest alone often does not solve the issue with pain returning when the child attempts to return to activity.

Bone often grows quicker than the muscle has time to stretch and adapt causing increased tension at the tendon attachment which can cause pain to develop. We cannot control this!

paediactricsHowever, we can have some control over other contributing factors such as;

  • Training load- how frequently/ intense training is, is it varied and balanced with good emphasis on technique and rest?
  • Poor biomechanics
  • Poor capacity of muscles to deal with rapid skeletal growth

Obtaining an early diagnosis and appropriate management plan should reduce the impact on a child’s participation in sport. An individualised rehabilitation program should be devised with the help of your physiotherapist to address the factors outlined above. A physio will also advice on which activities to temporarily limit and which to continue with and future training strategies.

More Information:

lisa

Lisa
x

Blog post by Lisa
Senior Physiotherapist
MSc MACP MHCPC MCSP 

Emma James Physio

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Benefits of working with a Personal Trainer

There are many reasons why having a Personal Trainer (PT) can benefit you, people of all ages and abilities. See better results by living a happier more active lifestyle.

A Personal Trainer will help build a unique training plan for each individual, which can easily be adapted and adjusted. Exercises can be regressed or progressed depending on the level of fitness, injury, results driven, time and if having an ‘off day’.

Top 5 Benefits

1. Faster and Better results

person-training-1Having a Personal Trainer will make sure you stick to your programme and push you to your limits during a workout session. Often when you work out solo you can become distracted and don’t push yourself as much. Time is always an excuse as not to work out but having a PT can adjust programs so they are just as affective no matter what the length of time you have available.
By pushing your boundaries, you will see faster results, this could be weight loss, toning up, cardio/fitness level or strength.

2. Fat loss and Muscle Gain
This is not everyone’s main goal but for 80% off people hitting the gym it is. Having a Personal Trainer, they know the right exercise each individual should be doing to achieve their goals. A mixture of weight training to gain muscles and become stronger and cardio to get fitter and leaner

3. Reduce chance of injury
A Personal Trainer will teach proper form and technique, which will prevent injury. Injuries can easily occur from not warming up properly or doing exercises incorrectly.

4. Establish a lifestyle habit and routine
A Personal Trainer can help motivate and encourage to create new habits. Once a routine is established it is easier to stick to, making it part of your lifestyle will make it easier to achieve results. Exercise and diet are all about consistency if you want to see those results.

5. They fit into your schedule
We all have busy lives and lots going on the beauty of a Personal Trainer is that they will adapt their time to fit in with you. So if you need an early morning or late evening workout a PT will be there.

person-training-outside6. Flexibility on Location
Many do not like working out in a gym as it can be crowded and over whelming. A Personal Trainer can change the location of any workout from either the gym, a home work out or even outside.

7. They can help with specific goals – an Event
As well helping set realistic goals a Personal Trainer can help set a training plan and train for specific event whether this be a run, triathlon, swim or a sporting event etc. With events you need to reach a certain level of fitness to be able to compete and stay injury free.

8. Mentor / Mental Health
Exercise realises endorphins which are ‘happy hormones’ they can help make you feel good physically and mentally. A Personal Trainer can help motivate you when you are suffering from mental health issues, they can help keep you on course to release the greatest number of endorphins. This in turn helps with a person’s overall wellbeing. A PT cares about how stressed you are, they will listen to you, they want to give you the best results which can be impacted on how you are feeling.

If this sounds interesting and you need that extra push why not call or email Emma James Physio to find out more….
reception@ejphysio.co.uk
01442 870686pippa

Pippa
x

Blog Post by Pippa
FCO Gym Manager & Personal Trainer
Emma James Physio

 

Work related stress & how to manage it

Up to half a million people in the UK experience work-related stress every year, which often results in illness (Health and Safety Executive 2011).

The signs of stress can vary from one individual to the next (NHS Choices 2011). They may manifest physically as an illness, tiredness or lethargy or as symptoms such as sore, tight muscles or erratic sleep patterns. Mental stress can result in depression, mood swings, anger, frustration, confusion, paranoid behaviour, jealousy or withdrawal.
Treatments include medication such as anti-anxiety drugs, cognitive behavioural therapy, relaxation techniques (NHS Choices 2011), acupuncture and floatation therapy.

How acupuncture can help

Stress is a common complaint cited by acupuncture and these individuals present with a variety of symptoms. Can acupuncture help with stress and anxiety? Let’s look at the research…..

One small randomised controlled trial (RCT) suggested that acupuncture might be successful in treating the symptoms of chronic stress (Huang 2011). Another study which looked at healthy individuals subjected to stress testing found acupuncture at an acupuncture point used for stress was more effective than a ‘control’ point (Fassoulaki 2003). A study by Pavao (2011) found acupuncture might be effective in attenuating psychological distress, as well as increasing cellular immunity. acupunctureIn a small pilot study, the use of one particular acupuncture point led to marked reductions in stress (Chan 2002).

Acupuncture is proposed to have many effects, including stimulating the nervous system and causing the release of neurochemical messenger molecules. The resulting biochemical changes influence the body’s homeostatic (state of equilibrium) mechanisms, thus promoting physical and emotional well-being.

Floatation Therapy

In addition to acupuncture, another alternative treatment for stress and anxiety is floatation therapy. During a floatation session you effortlessly float in an Epsom-salt solution. The solution is heated and maintained at skin temperature (37°C) and the environment in the tank is controlled so that the air is also skin temperature.

floatation-therapy
This creates an environment similar to that of the Dead Sea (but nearer to home!) which lets you float effortlessly on the surface of the solution, enjoying a feeling of total  freedom & complete weightlessness!

Preliminary research has shown that floatation therapy may lower stress, anxiety and even depression by reducing how much sensory input the brain and nervous system receive (Feinstein, 2018).

At Emma James we have our own Floatation Tank. Please just call us if you would like any more information on how this, or acupuncture, could help you.

lisa

Lisa
x

Blog post by Lisa
Senior Physiotherapist
MSc MACP MHCPC MCSP 

Emma James Physio

Rheumatoid Arthritis Awareness Week

nras-logoRheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Awareness Week 2019 takes place between June 17th and 23, and is an annual event to raise awareness of the condition. The event is run by the National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society (NRAS).

Physiotherapists are members of the multi-disciplinary team involved in the treatment and management of people with rheumatoid arthritis to help an individual achieve their short and long-term needs.

They work closely with multi-disciplinary team colleagues, such as occupational therapists, podiatrists and orthotists, and will refer you to them when necessary.

When will you see a physiotherapist?

Physiotherapists have a key role throughout the course of the disease. The extent of their involvement will vary throughout that time, dependent upon the individual’s needs.

What physiotherapy can offer an individual with Rheumatoid Arthritis:

After diagnosis they will offer education and advice, which is likely to include information regarding how to recognise and manage a flare, when to rest and when to exercise, and advice on how to modify activities to reduce pain and maintain/ improve function. People with rheumatoid arthritis often find that their joints become stiff and muscles become weak and therefore carrying out normal daily activities, such as getting up and down the stairs or in and out of a chair, can become hard. Physiotherapists can help by teaching mobility and strengthening exercises to increase movement and strength allowing better function.

Why exercise is important

exercise

Exercise is important as part of a healthy lifestyle to maintain fitness, control weight, maintain joint range of movement, improve muscle strength and endurance and improve mental wellbeing maintaining joint range of movement, strengthening muscle and increasing endurance.

A Physiotherapist is a specialist in advising on exercise. It is important to find a safe way of exercising that the individual enjoys and will be able to continue in the future.

Further reading:

anyoneanyage

 

lisa

Lisa
x

Blog post by Lisa
Senior Physiotherapist
MSc MACP MHCPC MCSP 

Emma James Physio

 

 

Surgery no more effective than physio for common shoulder condition…

As discussed on Radio 2, Jeremy Vine show, Wednesday last week.

shoulder-painResearchers show that one of the most common surgical procedures in the Western world is probably unnecessary. Keyhole surgeries of the shoulder are useless for patients with ‘shoulder impingement’, the most common diagnosis in patients with shoulder pain.

The Finnish Shoulder Impingement Arthroscopy Controlled Trial (FIMPACT) compared surgical treatment of shoulder impingement syndrome to placebo surgery. Two years after the procedure the study participants, both those in the group who underwent surgery and the ones in the placebo group, had equally little shoulder pain and were equally satisfied with the overall situation of their shoulder.

“These results show that this type of surgery is not an effective form of treatment for this most common shoulder complaint. With results as crystal clear as this, we expect that this will lead to major changes in contemporary treatment practices,” said the study’s principal investigators chief surgeon Mika Paavola and professor Teppo Järvinen from the Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki.

This research confirms previous randomised studies showing that keyhole decompression surgery of the shoulder does not alleviate the symptoms of patients any better than physiotherapy.

The FIMPACT study involved 189 patients suffering from persistent shoulder pain for at least three months despite receiving conservative treatment, physiotherapy and steroid injections. Patients were randomised to receive one of three different treatment options, subacromial decompression surgery, placebo surgery (diagnostic arthroscopy, which involved arthroscopic examination of the shoulder joint but no therapeutic procedures) or supervised exercise.

Two years after the start of the study, patients were asked about shoulder pain and other symptoms they had experienced, as well as their satisfaction with the treatment and its results. The patients in the decompression or placebo groups were also asked which group they believed they had been in — actual surgery or placebo.

Overall, shoulder pain was substantially improved in all three groups from the start of the trial. However, decompression surgery offered no greater benefit to shoulder pain than placebo surgery.

The group that received exercise therapy also improved over time.

“Based on these results, we should question the current line of treatment according to which patients with shoulder pain attributed to shoulder impingement are treated with decompression surgery, as it seems clear that instead of surgery, the treatment of such patients should hinge on nonoperative means,”

Järvinen states. “By ceasing the procedures which have proven ineffective, we would avoid performing hundreds of thousands useless surgeries every year in the world,”

Järvinen points out. “Fortunately, there seems to be light at the end of the tunnel as the NHS in England just released a statement that they will start restricting funding for ‘unnecessary procedures’ and the list includes subacromial decompression. We applaud this initiative and encourage other countries to follow this lead.”

“We have to spend taxpayers’ money responsibly. If we are spending money on procedures that are not effective, that money is deprived from treatments that are clinically effective and would provide benefits to patients. One component in becoming more efficient is to make sure we are not undertaking unnecessary procedures,” Dr. Taimela concludes.

The FIMPACT research project includes the Helsinki and Tampere University Hospitals in Finland.

lisa

Stay Healthy!
Lisa
x

Blog post by Lisa
Senior Physiotherapist
MSc MACP MHCPC MCSP 

Emma James Physio

“I’ve got that Plantar Fa…something”

At some point, we’ve all experienced some kind of pain in the foot, or know of someone who is currently experiencing/complaining about persistent foot pain. Perhaps it was around the time we decided to get back to the gym for six weeks. Perhaps it was after a major hike up in the Lake District. Perhaps it is just the nature of our job has a bartender. Quite often, we then get told – or even self diagnose – that it’s something called Plantar fasciitis. But what exactly is Plantar fasciitis?

The Plantar Fascia is a thick, strong band of connective tissue in the base of the foot, roughly spanning from the heel to just before our toes. Because of its structure, it acts as a shock absorber, provides structural supports for our arches; and mechanically acts as a spring when we walk and run. Plantar Fasci-itis is the name of the condition when this structure is irritated and inflammed, thus causing the persistent, and often flagrant pain.

What causes plantar fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis often occurs with a combination of physical, environmental, and social/work factors all impacting on the structure of the foot. Some of these are listed below:

  • Altered/poor gait (walking) biomechanics
  • Weakness in hip, knee, and/or foot muscles
  • Repetitive strain on the soft tissue
  • Recent change in physical workload (Predominantly overloading)
  • Poor/uncomfortable footwear

Treatment and Management

shutterstock_57382018The initial goal in managing plantar fasciitis is to reduce pain and inflammation. Your physiotherapist would be able to provide some manual treatment to help begin the recovery process. But it is also important to then assess and examine all these factors mentioned above in order to get to the root of the issue, and being able to prescribe the most appropriate management plan. This may include some stretching/strengthening exercises, modifications to your activities/daily schedule, and in some cases recommending extra assistance, such as an orthotic.

gait-scanAll our physiotherapists at Emma James are trained to assess any biomechanical issues, whilst the clinic is also equipped with purpose-specific pressure pads to perform a detailed gait analysis.

If this is something that you needed help with to get back to your work, your training, or even just to be pain-free, come and see our team of experts at Emma James Physio and we would love to help you!

kelvinKelvin

Kelvin Leung, Sports Physiotherapist
Emma James Physio

Knee Injury and risk of Osteoarthritis

A recent study published in the BMJ analysing the risk of developing knee osteoarthritis (OA) after knee trauma analysed over 1 million patients.

The risk of developing knee OA after ACL injury was 4 x higher compared to the non- injured knee or non- injured knee.

A meniscal (cartilage) injury and combined ACL/ meniscal injury as associated with 6x higher risk of developing OA.

Key messages:
1. The IMPORTANCE OF KNEE INJURY PREVENTION PROGRAMMES (strengthening).

2. The IMPORTANCE OF STRENGTHENING AFTER INJURY TO PREVENT or DELAY KNEE OA DEVELOPING.

apos therapy boots

If conventional physiotherapy alone is not being effective at reducing pain and improving function apos therapy is the next non- surgical option- customised and calibrated footwear to reduce pain and improve muscle control.

You can also book a free consultation, to see if Apos Therapy could work for you.

EJP_Book_your-Appointment-with-us-today

More Information:

lisa

Lisa
x

Blog post by Lisa
Senior Physiotherapist
MSc MACP MHCPC MCSP 

Emma James Physio

 

Looking after your mental health

MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS WEEK 13- 19TH MAY 2019

Mental health in numbers….

1 in 6 adults will have experienced a common mental health disorder in the last week.
Severe mental health illnesss affects about half a million adults in England and these individuals will have a life expectancy of up to 20 years shorter than the general population. (Public Health England).

improving mental health with exercise

Pain can limit a person’s ability to exercise. The loss of exercise as part of a person’s mental wellbeing can be devastating- benefits of exercise include stress relief, positive affect on body image, improved mood, improved sleep and increased confidence.

Come and see our team of experts at Emma James Physio to help diagnose, treat and manage your pain, to get you back to exercising for your mental and physical wellbeing.

lisa

Lisa
x

Blog post by Lisa
Senior Physiotherapist
Emma James Physio

 

Falling off a horse – my road to recovery (Part 2)

In my last post I spoke about my Injuries but today I want to share with you my road to recovery.

I tried many techniques to help speed up my healing process and strengthen my body for example:

The Bowen technique

  • Bowen is a holistic remedial body technique that works on the soft connective tissue (fascia) of the body. Bowen therapy can be used to treat musculoskeletal or related neurological problems including acute sports injuries and chronic or organic conditions. Bowen therapy is performed on the superficial and deep fascia.
  • Bowen Therapy may offer relief from pain, long-term injuries and illnesses, improved health and flexibility, improved sporting performance, relaxation, and emotional and mental well-being

Magnet therapy

magnet-therapy

  • Magnets have been used in alternative medicine for conditions ranging from systemic illnesses to joint pain. Some have proposed using magnets to help heal bone fractures. The idea is that magnets might improve circulation and increase blood flow, and thus the delivery of nutrients, to the fractured bone.
  • General rule to follow is black side of magnet on injury and red on the kidney

 

Floatation Therapy at Emma James Physio


The floatation tank is like a giant Epsom bath, heated to body temperature. It creates an environment similar to the Dead Sea. The are many benefits to a float, here are just a few:

  • Improve heart and circulatory health
  • Stimulate Lymphatic Draining – easing muscle pain
  • Lower blood pressure
  • Relieve stress

 

Physiotherapy

  • Relieving and manipulating the muscles in my back.
  • Stretching exercise specifically for my lower back/lumbar region and my quads and hamstrings which have become very tight due to the tension in my back.

 

Strength and Conditioning

  • Pilates work – building up the muscles in my back and core
  • Lots of body weight exercises and using resistance bands.


It has now been 4 months since my injury and pretty much back to full health. I still focus heavily on building up more core by doing Pilates work and I also stretch loads as I still get stiff down the right side of body and through my lower back. On the positive side I have learnt so much about my body and what I am capable of, I have also learnt my limitations and sometimes it’s ok not to push yourself to 100% max!

pippaThe human body is amazing.

Pippa
x

Blog Post by Pippa
FCO Gym Manager & Personal Trainer
Emma James Physio

 

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